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Georgiana

With teacher Georgiana since 2011.

#034 Business Expressions Idioms Examples Part #2

Listen to a new episode of Speak English Now Podcast, your favorite material for practicing your spoken and heard English. You will also learn about lifestyle and culture, language, vocabulary, and how to improve your English more effectively.

Transcript:

Hi everyone!

I’m Georgiana; founder of SpeakEnglishPodcast.com. My mission is to help YOU speak English fluently.

In today’s episode:

  • I’ll talk again about the most common business expressions.
  • Later, you’ll practice your English speaking with a funny story with questions and answers.

Awesome! Let’s get started!

  • A long shot

If you describe a solution to a problem as a remote possibility, it means there is little chance of success, but you think it’s worth a try. The idiom originates from the concept of a shot at a target from a great distance, therefore difficult to make.

Example:
“You could try to find that mysterious man. It’s a long shot, but you could start surfing the internet.”

  • To go broke

If you go broke, you experience a financial collapse. You’ll lose most or all of your money.

Example:
“Our company is going to go broke anytime unless you stop spending money foolishly.”

  • Start from scratch

The meaning of this expression is to start doing something over from the beginning.  The root of the expression comes from races in which the scratch line was the starting point and wouldn’t offer any advantage to anyone. Disabled people would be given shorter distances to run, but they would always start from scratch.

Example:
“The company expects me to start from scratch and redo the entire task because I missed a key point. 

  • Down the drain

This metaphoric term refers to water going down a drain and being carried off.

If something is going down the drain, it means that it’s getting worse or being destroyed and it’s unlikely to recover.

Example:
“Everything’s ruined. My big plans, my great company. All those years of work are down the drain.”

  • Go Out of Business

When a company goes out of business, or something puts it out of business, it stops operating, especially because of financial problems.

Example:
“Highest interest rates can drive small companies out of business.

(END OF THE EXTRACT).
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4 Comments

  1. Chimeddulam

    Georgiana is English teacher who is a nice and hardworking woman. Thank you so much about helping and improving my english skills

    Reply
  2. Minakshee

    I like the way she teach in her podcast, I find it very helpful to improve my English.

    After listening & reading the Transcript really helps me to understand better.

    Big Thanks to Teacher Georgiana.

    Reply
    • Zahra

      Hi .Georgiana is one of the best teachers I’ve known.her teachiing method is perfect .and really nice accent these amazing mini-stories help me improve my speaking English skill.thank you very much dear teacher .you are admirable

      Reply
      • GEORGIANA

        Thank you so much Zahra!!

        Reply

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With Georgiana’s method  I have started speaking English from minute one and this is exactly what I needed. With the traditional method you will practice grammar, grammar and grammar, but with Georgiana’s method you will practice listening and speaking and in my opinion this is the most important thing when you are learning a new language. Ricardo

“Thanks to Georgiana, I have lost my fear of speaking English. I have eliminated my frustration and started to enjoy this language.” Miriam

“I did not study English when I was a child. I contacted Georgiana at a time when I felt blocked. She has helped me to lose my fear of speaking English.” Ana